realistic recipes for a nutritious kitchen

“Slow Burning” Carbs

After I posted my “No vs. Slow Carbs” Video, a lot of people asked me for some examples of slow burning carbs.

Here is a list giving you a general idea of carbs that are considered “Slow Burners”.  Basically Slow Carbs include all fruits, veggies, beans, legumes, and whole grains!

Beans and Legumes:
Black Beans
Butter Beans
Cannellini beans
Edamame
Garbanzo beans
Kidney beans
Lentils
Pinto Beans
Split peas

Whole Grain Breads and Cereals:
Sourdough Bread
Rye Bread
Pumpernickel
Corn Tortillas
Sprouted Grain Breads (i.e. Ezekiel)
Whole Grain /Wheat Tortillas
All Bran Cereal
Kashi Go-lean
Oatmeal
Whole grain waffles
Whole grain pizza crust
Whole grain crackers

Fresh Fruits:

Apples
Apricots
Banana
Blueberries
Cantaloupe
Cherries
Grapefruit
Grapes
Kiwi
Lemon
Lime
Mango
Orange
Peach
Pears
Plums
Raspberries
Strawberries

Grains:
Barley
Buckwheat
Bulgur Wheat
Millet
Quinoa

Pasta and Rice:
Whole grain pasta
Brown rice
Whole-wheat couscous
Wild Rice

Veggies:
Artichokes
Asparagus
Beets
Beet greens
Broccoli
Brussel Sprouts
Cabbage
Carrots
Cauliflower
Celery
Cucumbers
Corn
Dandelion Greens
Eggplant
Endive
Garlic
Green Beans
Kale
Leeks
Lettuce
Mushrooms
Mustard Greens
Onions
Parsnips
Peas
Peppers
Pumpkin
Radishes
Spinach
Squash
Sweet Potatoes
Tomatoes

Share This:

4 Responses to ““Slow Burning” Carbs”

  1. #
    1
    kitchenMage — February 15, 2008 @ 5:38 pm

    Dani,

    I love succinct lists like this. Thanks! I do have one question, though. You include sourdough bread but most sourdough is just white bread with some starter. Am I missing something or is there an effect of the ‘souring’ process I am unfamiliar with?

    Curious,
    kitchenMage

  2. #
    2
    Dani — February 16, 2008 @ 4:21 pm

    KitchenMage – Great question! And you are right on with your guesses – the “souring” process does effect the rate at which our bodies break down and utilize the energy from sourdough bread.
    According to “The New Glucose Revolution”:
    The natural fermentation of the starch and sugars that make up the yeast starter culture in sourdough bread produce both lactic and propionic acid. These acids reduce the levels of blood glucose and insulin by 22 percent compared to normal white bread. In addition, studies show that people feel fuller and more satisfied, due to the decreased rate of digestion.
    Hope that helps!

  3. #
    3
    Krista — March 17, 2008 @ 7:52 pm

    Hi Dani,

    What about flours? Some are obvious: Whole wheat vs white flour and brown vs white rice flour. But what about other flours? I am on a gluten free diet so I use a lot of other flours and want to make sure that I am choosing more whole grain and less refined flours. Some of the main ones I use besides brown rice flour are: chickpea, buckwheat, arrowroot, corn, and soy flour.

  4. #
    4
    Dani — March 20, 2008 @ 10:11 am

    Krista – I would have to do a little more research to be sure but I am pretty certain that as long as the flours are not refined or processed you are in good shape:).

Leave a Comment





Current ye@r *