realistic recipes for a nutritious kitchen

Steel Cut vs. Rolled Oats

I’m a visual person.  I tend to understand things better when I see them.  So I thought it might be helpful to actually show you the visual difference between Steel Cut and Rolled Oats. As you can see, the rolled oats (on the left) look more like flakes and the steel cut oats (on the right) look more like kernels.

Like I mentioned before, that’s because Rolled Oats are more processed whereas the Steel Cut Oats are less processed and closer to their original, whole form. Calorie for calorie there is no nutritional difference, but the extra steps in the processing of rolled oats does diminish some of the micronutrients (vitamins and minerals) that oats have to offer (things like Magnesium and Selenium).

Again, either choice makes for an exceptionally d’lishes and nutritious breakfast!!

If you’re looking for a yummy way to eat your Oats, check out my “Pear Cobbler” Oatmeal.

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13 Responses to “Steel Cut vs. Rolled Oats”

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    Krista — February 29, 2008 @ 7:18 pm

    I haven’t used steel cut oats before but am planning on trying them soon.
    Can you use steel cut oats to replace rolled oats in recipes? I make my own granola and have several bread recipes that include rolled oats. Would steel cut work?

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      Alex — April 8, 2012 @ 6:31 pm

      Hello Krista could you pass me your granola recipe, I had being trying to make it but I always end up with something not soo tasty.
      Thanks

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    Dani — March 1, 2008 @ 9:07 am

    Krista – As far as know, you can’t use steel cut oats for for baking. They take much longer to cook than rolled oats and would not cook through in time. When you buy them you will see how different they are in their raw state, they are like little, hard pebbles.
    If anyone out there has baked with them, we’d love to hear your secrets.

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    Krista — March 2, 2008 @ 9:13 am

    Thanks Dani,
    Yes, once I bought them I realized I could have answered my own question! I think I’ll be keeping both on hand – thanks for taking the time to answer my question.

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    Brooke — March 18, 2008 @ 6:14 am

    Hi,
    I too am looking for steel cut oat recipes.
    Bread in particular.

    Thanks.
    Brooke

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    Dani — March 20, 2008 @ 10:13 am

    Brooke – Like I mentioned before, steel cut oats don’t really work when it comes to baking. You are better off sticking to rolled oats.

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    Kevin — April 17, 2008 @ 8:29 am

    Before using steel cut oats in a recipe, you might soak them in water for 30 min or so before incorporating them into your recipe.

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    Dani — April 19, 2008 @ 3:07 pm

    Kevin – great tips…thanks!

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    Benjamin — July 30, 2010 @ 7:50 am

    Thanks, been trying out steel cut oats for breakfast after reading about their benefits. Wasn’t sure whether to go with Rolled Oats or Steel cut oats; wanted the one with the most nutritional value.

    The thing is that I notice with 4 tablespoons of steel cut oat would make one serving for me but I need almost double of rolled oats so wouldn’t that mean consuming more nutrients and fiber?

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    Plato — October 13, 2011 @ 5:21 pm

    One of the easiest way to cook steel cut oats is, at night, add 1/4 cup of dry steel cut oats in 1 cup of boiling water,cover it & let it stand. In the morning it is ready to heat & eat, adding to it whatever you wish. I usually add some sauted veggies, hot peppers, & some cheese (I like gorgonzola). But it’s yummy with fresh fruits & nuts too, or any way you may like it. I do the same with cracked wheat, available in Indian grocery stores, it’s called “dalia.” I usually add some dries berries & dried fruit to it at night itself, to let the fruit plumpp up.

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    mike — June 26, 2012 @ 9:09 am

    Steel cut oats will work fine in recipes if you soften them properly first, either by soaking overnight or boiling before using. Be adventurous, if it doesn’t work perfectly, try again! I can imagine the added chewiness of the steel cut oats would add great texture to whatever your cooking…

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    Sally O'Brien — July 23, 2013 @ 7:48 am

    are oats of any kind gluten free?

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      Dani — July 25, 2013 @ 5:54 pm

      Oats are technically gluten free but it depends where they are processed. Many share space with non-gluten free products, so just be sure to read packages if you have gluten sensitivites.

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